Saturday, February 22, 2020

Counterterrorism and Information Systems Your protection versus your Research Paper - 1

Counterterrorism and Information Systems Your protection versus your rights - Research Paper Example The war towards terrorism has never been a smooth path, hence a number of ethical issues had to be broken. A country is always torn by the dilemma of either protecting its citizens from terrorism by use of information technology to feed them with required data to help them fight terrorism and the constitutional rights of individuals to have their personal rights. It is evident that a sound decision in such a case is necessary as this is an ethical dilemma and one that can cause problems if messed around with. Vital information regarding people’s lives is usually interfered with in the process of counterterrorism. For instance, the government usually uses personal databases to extract information about certain people hence breaching their constitutional personal rights. Faced with a tough decision on breaking its constitutional mandate to protect its citizens from terrorists and protecting their rights, somehow calls for a proper decision on whether counterterrorism use of information technology is ethical There usually so many ways which the government can combat terrorism without interfering with the personal rights of their individuals. This can involve sending spies to terrorist zones, of which it has not been successful as they eventually get discovered and stringent punishment administered to them. Another alternative to the government combating terrorism will be through fighting together with other countries to ensure that the leaders and the culprits funding them are detained. In practical sense, these has been one impossible affair since most of the terrorist groups usually live in hiding and have spies all over when soldiers come to attack them. Another alternative that can be used to combat terrorism may be through rigorous checks and racial profiling of individuals from countries prone to harbour terrorist,

Wednesday, February 5, 2020

Music 004 written assignment Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 750 words

Music 004 written assignment - Essay Example This is a wonderful children’s movie that emphasizes the values of family. It reinforces the fact that people are never apart in spirit although they may be physically separated. is a plucky, happy-go-lucky fish and the music reflects that character. Music says a lot about the personality of a character. This music is free-flowing, happy, and joyful in tone. Basically, Nemo’s life is good and this music reflects the joy and wonder he has in his life. This clip reveals what Nemo’s family life is like, and is a little curio which showcases how good life is before he gets lost. At this point the story is still in the stage of exposition—there is some narrative hook that is going to grab the audience, but not quite yet. The music is light and happy. creates a joyful and carefree atmosphere. This music is supposed to characterize Nemo’s life as a young fish—he does not have any worries, and his life is relatively unfettered by problems of the world out in the big sea, as he mainly sticks close to home. However, the music does foreshadow, at least a bit in all its utter happiness, that perhaps this music is a backdrop for the more serious material that is going to be coming in the future. Basically this â€Å"happy† music is a lead-in to a more tranquil side of music which will match the tone of the movie when Nemo gets lost. In that sense, this music can sound very superficial and has almost a dreamlike quality to it. gets lost. As Marlin (one of the characters) says, â€Å"No! I didnt come this far to be breakfast!†1 So is the struggle that Nemo will find once he leaves the ambience of the happy music. Music has the ability to give a certain quality to situations on-screen that otherwise would not have been as clearly delineated. In Finding Nemo, the composers do an excellent job of conveying feelings through the music. make the audience aware of the happy life Nemo had before getting lost—but it also conveys a

Tuesday, January 28, 2020

Applications Of Forced Convection Engineering Essay

Applications Of Forced Convection Engineering Essay The experiment was carried out to verify the relationship between Nusselt number , Reynolds number and Prandtl Number using the different concepts of convection. Relative discussions and conclusions were drawn including the various factors affecting the accuracy of the calculated results. The main objective of this experiment was to verify the following heat transfer relationship: Therefore, the experiment is conducted by an apparatus where hot ait from heater is generated and flow through copper tube. Different values of temperatures and pressure were taken and recorded in order to calculate. Besides, graphs plotted and analysed to have a better understanding of convection heat transfer. Thus a Laboratory experiment was conducted where hot air from a heater was introduced through a copper tube with the help of a blower. Thermocouples were fixed in placed at various locations along the length of the copper tube. The different values of temperature and pressure were measured along with the various sections of the tube and other required values were recorded and calculated. Graphs were also plotted with the data obtained and then analysed. INTRODUCTION Heat transfer science deals with the time rate of energy transfer and the temperature distribution through the thermal system. It may be take place in three modes which is conduction, convection and radiation. Theory of convection is presented since this experiment is concerned about convective heat transfer. Convective is the mode of energy transfer between a solid surface and the adjacent liquid or gas that is in motion due to a temperature difference. It involves the combined effects of conduction and fluid motion. There are two major type of convective Forced convection is known as fluid motion generated by blowing air over the solid by using external devices such as fans and pumps. The other type is natural convection which meant by a phenomenon that occurs in fluid segments and facilitated by the buoyancy effect. It is less efficient than forced convection, due to the absence of fluid motion. Hence, it depends entirely on the strength of the buoyancy effect and the fluid viscosity. Besides, there is no control on the rate of heat transfer. Forced Convection Force convection is a mechanism of heat transfer in which fluid motion is generated by an external source like a pump, fan, suction device, etc. Forced convection is often encountered by engineers designing or analyzing pipe flow, flow over a plate, heat exchanger and so on. Convection heat transfer depends on fluids properties such as: Dynamic viscosity ( µ) Thermal conductivity (k) Density (à Ã‚ ) Specific heat (Cp) Velocity (V) Type of fluid flow (Laminar/Turbulent) Newtons law of cooling Where h = Convection heat transfer (W/(m2. °C) A = Heat transfer area = Temperature of solid surface ( °C) = Temperature of the fluid ( °C) The convective heat transfer coefficient (h) is dependent upon the physical properties of the fluid and the physical situation. Applications of Forced Convection In a heat transfer analysis, engineers get the velocity result by performing a fluid flow analysis. The heat transfer results specify temperature distribution for both the fluid and solid components in systems such as fan or heat exchanger. Other applications for forced convection include systems that operate at extremely high temperatures for functions for example transporting molten metal or liquefied plastic. Thus, engineers can determine what fluid flow velocity is necessary to produce the desired temperature distribution and prevent parts of the system from failing. Engineers performing heat transfer analysis can simply click an option to include fluid convection effects and specify the location of the fluid velocity results during setup to yield forced convection heat transfer results. TYPICAL APPLICATIONS Computer case cooling Cooling/heating system design Electric fan simulation Fan- or water-cooled central processing unit (CPU) design Heat exchanger simulation Heat removal Heat sensitivity studies Heat sink simulation Printed Circuit Board (PCB) simulation Thermal optimization Forced Convection through Pipe/Tubes In a flow in tupe, the growth of the boundary layer is limited by the boundary of the tube. The velocity profile in the tube is characterized by a maximum value at the centerline and zero at the boundary. For a condition where the tube surface temperature is constant, the heat transfer rate can be calculated from Newtons cooling law. Reynolds Number Reynolds number can be used to determine type of flow in fluid such as laminar or turbulent flow. Laminar flow occurs at low Reynolds numbers, where viscous forces are dominant. The condition of flow is smooth and constant fluid motion. Meanwhile, turbulent flow occurs at high Reynolds number and is dominated by inertial forces and it produce random eddies, vortices and other flow fluctuations. Reynolds number is a dimensionless number. It is the ratio of the inertia forces to the viscous forces in the fluids. Equation for Reynolds Number in pipe or tube is as below: Where à Ã‚  = Fluid density (kg/m3) V = Fluid velocity (m/s) D = Diameter of pipe ÃŽÂ ¼ = The dynamic viscosity of the fluid (Pa ·s or N ·s/m ²) ÃŽÂ ½ = Kinematic viscosity (ÃŽÂ ½ = ÃŽÂ ¼ / à Ã‚ ) (m ²/s) Q = Volumetric flow rate (m ³/s) A = Pipe cross-sectional area (m2) EXPERIMENT OVERVIEW Apparatus Figure 1 : Apparatus being used The experimental apparatus comprises of a copper pipe, which is supplied with air by a centrifugal blower and heater as figure 1. The test section of the pipe is wound with a heating tape, which is covered with lagging. Six copper constantan thermocouples are brazed into the wall of the test section. Another six thermocouples extend into the pipe to measure the flowing air temperature. In addition five static pressure tapping are positioned in the tube wall. A BS 1042 standard orifice and differential manometer measure the air mass flow rate though the pipe. Experimental Procedure Fully close the valve which controlling the air flow rate. Measure the everage intermal diameter (D) of the test section pipe by using a vernier calliper. Adjust the inclination angle of the manometer bundle ÃŽÂ ± to 30 °. Start the blower and turn the valve to the fully open position gradually, Adjust the power input to the heating tape to its maximum valve and allow the apparatus to attain thermal equilibrium. Take down the data and record Pressure drop through the metering orifice Pressure and temperature downstream of the orifice Ammeter and voltmeter readings Tube wall temperature along the testing section Air temperature along the test section Air pressure along the test section Ambient temperature and pressure. Repeat the foregoing procedure for another four different flow rate and adjust the heater input to give approximately the same wall temperature at each flow rate. DATA AND MEASUREMENT TABLE Property Symbol Units Value Barometric Pressure Pb mm Hg 741.60 Diameter of the test section pipe Dp m 0.038 Density of water (Manometers fluid) à Ã‚  Kg/m3 1000 Angle of the manometers bundle ÃŽÂ ± degree 30 Property Symbol Units Test 1 2 3 4 5 Pressure drop across orifice ΆH mm H2O 685 565 460 360 260 Pressure drop d/s orifice to atmosphere ΆP mm H2O 178 152 120 93 68 Air temperature downstream orifice t  °C 35 38 38 38 39 EMF (Voltage) across tape V Volts 230 200 165 142 129 Current through tape heater I Amps 7.3 6.3 5.5 5.0 4.0 Flowing air temperature t1  °C 35.0 36.9 38.2 40.0 41.4 Flowing air temperature t2  °C 36.1 37.7 38.9 40.6 41.9 Flowing air temperature t3  °C 43.1 43.6 43.4 44.4 45.6 Flowing air temperature t4  °C 42.2 42.4 42.4 43.5 44.6 Flowing air temperature t5  °C 49.6 48.6 47.0 47.3 48.1 Flowing air temperature t6  °C 63.2 59.6 55.7 54.3 54.6 Tube wall temperature t7  °C 38.9 40.0 40.6 41.9 43.0 Tube wall temperature t8  °C 81.20 73.6 65.9 62.2 61.2 Tube wall temperature t9  °C 99.8 89.1 77.5 71.5 69.5 Tube wall temperature t10  °C 105.9 93.9 81.3 74.6 72.4 Tube wall temperature t11  °C 106.5 94.5 81.8 75.1 73.1 Tube wall temperature t12  °C 108.1 95.5 82.3 75.0 72.5 Air static gauge pressure (Άl.sin ÃŽÂ ±) P1 mm H2O 385 324 255 195 145 Air static gauge pressure (Άl.sin ÃŽÂ ±) P2 mm H2O 264 223 175 132 99 Air static gauge pressure (Άl.sin ÃŽÂ ±) P3 mm H2O 210 181 141 108 79 Air static gauge pressure (Άl.sin ÃŽÂ ±) P4 mm H2O 108 97 81 57 42 Air static gauge pressure (Άl.sin ÃŽÂ ±) P5 mm H2O 23 31 20 16 14 Air static gauge pressure (Άl.sin ÃŽÂ ±) P6 mm H2O à ¢Ã¢â‚¬ °Ã‹â€ 0 à ¢Ã¢â‚¬ °Ã‹â€ 0 à ¢Ã¢â‚¬ °Ã‹â€ 0 à ¢Ã¢â‚¬ °Ã‹â€ 0 à ¢Ã¢â‚¬ °Ã‹â€ 0 Sample Calculations Based on 1st set data, Power Input to the tape heater: Power = = (230 x 7.3)/1000 = 1.679 Absolute Pressure downstream of the orifice: 741.60 + (178/13.6)=754.69 mmHg Absolute Temperature downstream of the orifice: T = t + 273 = 365+ 273 = 308 K The Air Mass Flow Rate: air =5.66x = = 231.88 231.88 Kg/hr = 0.06441 Kg/sec, Since 1 Kg/hr = Kg/sec Average Wall Temperature: = (38.9+81.2+99.8+105.9+106.5+108.1)/6 =90.07 Average Air Temperature: = (35+36.1+43.1+42.2+49.6+63.2)/6 = 44.87 The Bulk Mean Air (arithmetic average of mean air) Temperature: = (35+63.2)/6 =49.1 The Absolute Bulk Mean Air (arithmetic average of mean air) Temperature: 49.1+273 =322.10 K The Properties of Air at Tb: Using the tables provided in Fundamentals of Thermal-Fluid Sciences by Yunus A.Cengel From the table A-18 (Page958), Properties of Air at 1atm pressure at K Density, à Ã‚  = 1.1029 kg/m3 Specific Heat Capacity, Cp = 1.006 kJ/(kg.K) Thermal Conductivity, k = 0.0277 kW/(m.K) Dynamic Viscosity,  µ = 1.95 x 10-5 kg/(m.s) Prandtl Number, Pr = 0.7096 The Increase in Air Temperature: 63.2-35 = 28.2 The Heat Transfer to Air: (231.88/3600) x 1.006 x 28.2 =1.827 Where: = Heat Transfer to air = Mass flow rate = Specific heat capacity = Increase in air temperature The Heat Losses: 1.679-1.827 = -0.148 Where: = Heat losses = Heat Transfer to air The Wall/Air Temperature Difference: 90.07-44.87 = 45.2 Where: = Wall/Air temperature difference = Average air temperature The Heat Transfer Coefficient: = ((231.88/3600) x 1.006 x 28.2) / (3.14 x .0382 x 1.69 x 45.2) = 0.199 kW/ (m^2 .k) Where: = Mass flow rate = Specific heat capacity = Increase in air temperature = Average Diameter of the Copper pipe. = Length of the tube = Wall/Air temperature difference The Mean Air Velocity: = (4 x (231.88/3600))/ (1.1029 x 3.14 x (0.0382 ^2) = 50.9575 m/s Where: = Mean air velocity = Mass flow rate = Density = Average Diameter of the Copper pipe. The Reynolds Number: The Nusselt Number: = Nusselt Number = Average Diameter of the Copper pipe. = Thermal conductivity The Stanton Number: Where: St = Stanton Number = Nusselt Number = Prandtl number Re = Reynolds number The Pressure Drop across the testing section: at Tb = 320.1 K = Pressure drop across the testing section = Absolute pressure downstream of orifice. = Barometric Pressure The Friction Factor: RESULT Power Power kW 1.679 1.260 0.908 0.710 0.516 Absolute Pressure downstream of the orifice P mm Hg 754.69 752.78 750.42 748.44 746.60 Absolute temperature downstream of the orifice T K 308 311 311 311 312 Pressure drop across the orifice à ¢Ã‹â€ Ã¢â‚¬  H mm H20 685 565 460 360 260 Air mass flow Rate air 231.88 209.31 188.57 166.60 141.18 Average wall Temperature tw 90.07 81.1 71.57 66.72 65.28 Average air temperature tair av 44.87 44.80 44.27 45.02 46.03 Bulk Mean air temperature tb 49.1 48.25 46.95 47.15 48.0 Absolute bulk mean air temperature Tb K 322.1 321.25 319.95 320.15 321.0 Density at Tb à Ã‚  1.1029 1.1058 1.1102 1.1095 1.1066 Specific Heat Capacity at Tb Cp 1.0060 1.0060 1.0060 1.0060 1.0060 Thermal Conductivity at Tb K 2.77 2.76 2.75 2.75 2.76 Dynamic Viscosity at Tb ÃŽÂ ¼ 1.95 1.95 1.94 1.94 1.95 Prandtl Number at Tb Pr 0.7096 0.7096 0.7100 0.7100 0.7098 Increase in air temperature from t1 to t6 à ¢Ã‹â€ Ã¢â‚¬  t a 28.2 22.7 17.5 14.3 13.2 Heat transfer to air air W 1.827 1.328 0.922 0.666 0.521 Heat losses losses W -0.148 -0.068 -0.015 -0.044 -0.005 Wall/Air temperature difference à ¢Ã‹â€ Ã¢â‚¬  t m 45.2 36.3 27.3 21.7 19.25 Heat transfer Coefficient h 0.199 0.180 0.167 0.151 0.133 Mean air velocity Cm 50.9575 45.877 41.167 36.394 30.922 Reynoldss Number Re 110096.353 99380. 144 89994. 330 79509. 225 67204. 418 Nusselt Number Nu 274.4 249 232 209.8 184.1 Stanton Number St 0.00351 0.00353 0.00363 0.0037 0.0039 Pressure Drop across the testing section à ¢Ã‹â€ Ã¢â‚¬  P 1746.42 1491.59 1176.73 912.57 667.08 Friction Factor f 0.01378 0.0145 0.0141 0.0141 0.0143 Results Plot A Experiment 1 2 3 4 5 Y=ln(Nu x Pr-0.4) 5.75 5.65 5.58 5.48 5.35 X=ln(Re0.8) 9.29 9.21 9.13 9.03 8.89 Y-X -3.54 -3.56 -3.55 -3.55 -3.54 Plot B Experiment 1 2 3 4 5 Y=Nu 274.4 249 232 209.8 184.1 X=Re x Pr 78124.37 70520.15 63895.97 56451.55 47701.69 Stanton number: Reynolds Analogy: Experiment 1 2 3 4 5 Friction factor 0.01378 0.0145 0.0141 0.014 0.0143 Reynolds Analogy 0.00689 0.00725 0.00705 0.007 0.00715 Stanton number 0.00351 0.00353 0.00363 0.0372 0.0386 DISCUSSION In order to get more accurate results, there are some suggestions like cleaning the manometer, checking the insulation on the pipe and making sure the valve is closed tightly. An additional way to prove the heat transfer equation is by re-arranging it. Nu = 0.023 x (Re0.8 x Pr 0.4) Substituting in the experimental values into the above equation from section 5.0 returns the following results below: Experiment 1 2 3 4 5 Y=Nu 274.4 249 232 209.8 184.1 X=Re0.8 x Pr0.4 9415.08 8674.51 8014.48 7258.34 6344.14 Y/X 0.029 0.0287 0.0289 0.0289 0.029 Comparing this to the heat transfer constant, it shows that there is a little difference only which can be negligible. It can also be done by taking the gradient of the line from the plot Nu against (Re0.8 x Pr0.4) as shown below: CONCLUSION A better understanding of the heat transfer was achieved through conducting the experiment. Theoretical sums and experimental values were found to be approximately similar and the different sources of error have been identified. The main objective of this experiment was to verify the following heat transfer relationship: Nu = 0.023 x (Re0.8 x Pr 0.4) Therefore, relation of forced convective heat transfer in pipe is cleared and the objectives were completed.

Monday, January 20, 2020

Kants Humanity Formula Essay -- Kant Philosophy Philosophical Essays

Kant's Humanity Formula   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã¢â‚¬Å"Few formulas in philosophy have been so widely accepted and variously interpreted as Kant’s injunction to treat humanity as an end in itself†(Hill, 38). Immanuel Kant’s views, as elucidated in his book, Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals, are based on the belief that â€Å"people count† by prohibiting actions which exploit other individuals in order for self-prosperity or altruistic ends. Ethics then, are confirmed by the dignity and worth of the rational agency of each person. Since human beings are the only rational beings capable of decision making and reasonable judgement, humanity must be valued. Kant proposes a test that ensures that humanity is treated with respect, and not used merely as an instrument. To understand how he defines this test, we must first take a look at the foundation of his main principle, the Categorical Imperative. Kant’s way of determining morality of actions is quite different from other philosophers, and many find it extremely hard to grasp or implausible. The central concept of his basic test for morality found in his Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals is the categorical imperative. â€Å"The representation of an objective principle, insofar as it is necessitating for a will, is called a command (of reason), and the formula of the command is called an imperative†(Kant, 24). In other words, an imperative is something that a will ought or shall do because the will is obligated to act in a way in which conforms to moral law. Imperatives can also be referred to as the supreme principle of morality. According to Kant, there are two types of imperatives: hypothetical and categorical. Hypothetical imperatives are actions that look for the best means to a goal, however, the goal might not necessarily be an end in itself. On the other hand, the categorical imperative is an objectively necessary means to an end in itself, and the action to obtain the end, must have moral worth. If we as rational agents, have any morality at all Kant says, it takes the form of rational, categorical imperatives (commands of reason) and is found a priori excluding all interests and desires. These commands of reason are proven by the Universal Law Formula, which when applied, is a method for determining the morality of actions. How is this formula applied though? Kantian philosophy is derived from the belief that ac... ...eir judgement wisely enough to know that lying would create better outcomes in many situations. This essentially, would be a Utilitarian’s argument. Moral actions are based on consequences; ones which increase happiness or positive outcomes. Telling a lie to the murderer to send him astray would save a life, and consequently would be a moral action. Utilitarianism would take into account the future repercussions caused by the lie, but the analysis of an action still lies in the foreseen or predicted consequences rather than on the action’s intrinsic moral value. Morality then, would be judged on a case by case basis. Kant’s perspective refutes this by saying morality loses its value as a universal quality. Although situations change, the basis for acting (morality) must stay the same and actions are moral or immoral, regardless of any immediate consequences. Still, morality is based on constantly changing and often unpredictable outcomes. Kantian philosophy, even interpreted by Kant himself, is overly extreme and the strict application of its principles is too stringent. Although there is no definite foundation to base morality on, the universal law formula is highly implausible. Kant's Humanity Formula Essay -- Kant Philosophy Philosophical Essays Kant's Humanity Formula   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã¢â‚¬Å"Few formulas in philosophy have been so widely accepted and variously interpreted as Kant’s injunction to treat humanity as an end in itself†(Hill, 38). Immanuel Kant’s views, as elucidated in his book, Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals, are based on the belief that â€Å"people count† by prohibiting actions which exploit other individuals in order for self-prosperity or altruistic ends. Ethics then, are confirmed by the dignity and worth of the rational agency of each person. Since human beings are the only rational beings capable of decision making and reasonable judgement, humanity must be valued. Kant proposes a test that ensures that humanity is treated with respect, and not used merely as an instrument. To understand how he defines this test, we must first take a look at the foundation of his main principle, the Categorical Imperative. Kant’s way of determining morality of actions is quite different from other philosophers, and many find it extremely hard to grasp or implausible. The central concept of his basic test for morality found in his Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals is the categorical imperative. â€Å"The representation of an objective principle, insofar as it is necessitating for a will, is called a command (of reason), and the formula of the command is called an imperative†(Kant, 24). In other words, an imperative is something that a will ought or shall do because the will is obligated to act in a way in which conforms to moral law. Imperatives can also be referred to as the supreme principle of morality. According to Kant, there are two types of imperatives: hypothetical and categorical. Hypothetical imperatives are actions that look for the best means to a goal, however, the goal might not necessarily be an end in itself. On the other hand, the categorical imperative is an objectively necessary means to an end in itself, and the action to obtain the end, must have moral worth. If we as rational agents, have any morality at all Kant says, it takes the form of rational, categorical imperatives (commands of reason) and is found a priori excluding all interests and desires. These commands of reason are proven by the Universal Law Formula, which when applied, is a method for determining the morality of actions. How is this formula applied though? Kantian philosophy is derived from the belief that ac... ...eir judgement wisely enough to know that lying would create better outcomes in many situations. This essentially, would be a Utilitarian’s argument. Moral actions are based on consequences; ones which increase happiness or positive outcomes. Telling a lie to the murderer to send him astray would save a life, and consequently would be a moral action. Utilitarianism would take into account the future repercussions caused by the lie, but the analysis of an action still lies in the foreseen or predicted consequences rather than on the action’s intrinsic moral value. Morality then, would be judged on a case by case basis. Kant’s perspective refutes this by saying morality loses its value as a universal quality. Although situations change, the basis for acting (morality) must stay the same and actions are moral or immoral, regardless of any immediate consequences. Still, morality is based on constantly changing and often unpredictable outcomes. Kantian philosophy, even interpreted by Kant himself, is overly extreme and the strict application of its principles is too stringent. Although there is no definite foundation to base morality on, the universal law formula is highly implausible.

Sunday, January 12, 2020

Coca Cola Share A Coke This Summer

However, in reality the Coca Cola Company has a wider target market because the product is addressed to everyone and everywhere. Usually the consumers (both males and females)who use the product are between 12 and 32 years old. Second, in the video we can see that the consumers are buying the product, this shows the reputation of the trademark in the mind of the consumers and a few seconds later we can see more people buying Coca-Cola in massive amounts which reflects the power, the preference and the loyalty that the consumers have to the Coca-Cola brand.In the video, after the consumers brought the product we can see them having fun, having barbecues, having arties and playing on the street with their friends, in that moment Coca-Cola is telling us the viewers that the purpose of this video is not only to show the popularity of the brand but also that the company is not just about selling goods to the consumers but also selling events ( Examples: World cup and the Olympics) and exp eriences ( Examples: Walt Disney magic kingdom and music/sports camps) to the consumers.Coca-Cola is the number one company of soft drinks around the world, the margin between it and its is competitors is huge, so the reason that Coca-Cola peps doing the advertising is not to increase their sales, but to remind people that Coca-Cola is here, is number one and the consumers should drink Coke once in a while(Hardball Peter, 2014) . Like this advertising and many others, Coca-Cola focus on the principle of sharing; not only sharing with families and friends but also sharing happiness, moments and experience. This attitude of sharing IS key competitive advantage against their competitors which only focus on sales.Finally, the video is showing a strategy to put their consumers names on the tootles. The purpose of this idea is to create an individualized or personalized product for the customers for the summer of 2014 because in summer, is the perfect time to be with other people and shar e moments of happiness with everyone. According to the senior vice president Stuart Kerosene the message of this advertising is to drink a coke with your name on it and offering the event to another person makes these minutes much more â€Å"extraordinary† (Money Jay, 2014).Another strategy for the development of this commercial was the flexibility to low the consumers to promote the brand across social media. Jennifer Whelan group director of Coca Cola North America says â€Å"It's about statement toward oneself, individual narrating and staying associated with companions. ‘Share a Coke' takes advantage of those passions†. She also adds that â€Å"At the point when teenagers see that the iconic.

Saturday, January 4, 2020

Immigration During The United States - 1199 Words

Let Immigration in America be Great â€Å"Remember, remember always, that all of us, and you and I especially, are descended from immigrants and revolutionists† (Franklin D. Roosevelt). For many years immigration has been a controversial topic, despite the fact that most of us are either immigrants or descendants of immigrants. Unless one is a Native American, most people migrated here from Mexico, China, or any other country besides the United States. The majority of immigrants in this country are here for many reasons, but one of the primary reasons is to seek better opportunities for themselves and their families. There have been many issues in regards to finding a solution to the unfixed immigration system in the United States. Everyone has their individual opinion in regards to immigration and how illegal immigrants are shaping the U.S today. In recent years, we have made an attempt to pass the Dream Act, which failed. However, the DACA program was successfully passed, but has it been beneficial? Unfortunately, it was not as effective as the Dream Act would have been. Immigration equality explains the new policy that was created by president Obama. â€Å"On June 15, 2012, President Barack Obama created a new policy that called for deferred action for eligible undocumented youth and young adults who were brought to this country as children.† (DACA). This executive order allowed many young undocumented immigrants to avoid temporarily deportation from the United States. YoungShow MoreRelatedImmigration During The United States1078 Words   |  5 Pageshappening. While immigration has been with the U.S. from the very beginning, it’s becoming worse with every year. 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Immigration is defined as people who move to a new country where they are not consideredRead MoreImmigration During The United States1662 Words   |  7 PagesTara Paddyaker PS1113 Roni O’Dell Word: 1662 Immigration Immigration has played a huge role in settling America. Once known as â€Å"the melting pot† America has a wider diverse population. The history of immigration is what built America and created that diversity. Over the last 150 years, immigration laws have been enacted and changed to meet the demands of the influx of immigrants. Both Republicans and Democrats see immigration as a political battlefield. Each party blames the other for the lackRead MoreImmigration During The United States1902 Words   |  8 PagesImmigration in America Immigration in America started way back in the day specifically in 1600 with the English pilgrims. People tend migrate in other countries for many different reasons. The colonization/mass immigration to the Americas started with Europeans seeking for religious freedom, about 100 settlers has settled themselves not too far from Plymouth, Massachusetts in 1620.They were welcomed by the native people who taught them how to survive some bad weather condition. The settlers cameRead MoreImmigration Reform During The United States925 Words   |  4 Pagesboth legal and illegal are mainly from Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean. Uncontrolled immigration has been blamed on loss of jobs, higher crime rates and housing problems in the US. While these immigrants play a unique role in the economy, the executive and the legislature have found it necessary to control the inflow of these immigrants for various reasons. A number of laws and immigration policies have been enacted to create order in this issue. How these laws are perceived by immigrantsRead MoreBenefits Of Immigration Reform During The United States Essay1651 Words   |  7 PagesBenefits of Immigration Reform Today, the need for immigration reform questions many economic, political and moral realities in our country. In particular, the current immigration reform as a major issue in the Latino community. Each area will be examined with an emphasis on how each is beneficial to the economy, as well as touching on the differences between the key opinions around immigration reform. Latinos make up a large portion of the people impacted by the outcome reform bill. The MigrationRead MoreImmigration Reform During The United States1120 Words   |  5 PagesImmigration Reform Immigration reform has long been a battle for the United States and its people. One side of the spectrum the American people say, bring more people in and the other side says, enough! Lock the borders! Send them home. So who is right? The complexity of the immigration issue is not easily answered morally, however studies show the economic impact is vastly different in the way we choose to handle this problem. This article explores several economic possibilities if another massRead MoreThe Struggles Of Immigration During The United States2707 Words   |  11 PagesThe Struggles of Immigration â€Å"Remember, remember always, that all of us, and you and I especially, are descended from immigrants and revolutionists.† (― Franklin D. Roosevelt) Immigration itself is a powerful word to all immigrants living in the United States. Let’s be honest with ourselves when you hear the word immigration, the first thing that pops up in our minds is Mexican. Why is it that when we hear the word immigration we think of Mexicans? That is something that nobody will ever understandRead MoreAnti Immigration And Xenophobia During The United States2083 Words   |  9 PagesWhen thinking of Europe, it is automatically thought of anti-immigration and xenophobia due to the numbers of immigrants from diverse parts of the world; that is with the exception of Spain. A country in the south of France with southern borders to a developing country and a strong colonizing history, Spain does not seem like a country that had just started to become an immigration country. For a country with recent immigration history, it does have a lot of migration dilemmas that test the toleranceRead MoreMexican Immigration And The United States1563 Words   |à ‚  7 PagesThrough studying immigration statistical data, it has been found that the highest percentage of mexican immigration has occurred on the most recent decades. However, there was a high percentage of mexican immigration on the years of the 1920s and the 1940s. These two decades were having an increase in mexican immigration due to the establishment of the Bracero Program. This program was started during the 1920s and again in the 1940s, but was later stopped in the 1960s. Between and after, these time

Thursday, December 26, 2019

Body Parts in Japanese Vocabulary

Body parts are important terms to know, regardless of the language you are speaking. And Japanese is no exception. Whether you want to say the Japanese word for head (atama),  hair (kami), or even the toe (tsumasaki), its important not just to know their  meanings, but to be able to pronounce each body part correctly. Parts of the Body (Karada Bubun) The table below presents the Japanese words for body parts, with the Japanese word written in Latin script (romaji) on the left, followed by the body part listed in Japanese letters (kanji), with the English translation on the right. Click the links to hear the correct pronunciations. karada body atama head kami hair kao face hitai forehead me eye mayu eyebrow mabuta eyelid matusge eyelash hana nose mimi ear kuchi mouth kuchibiru lip ha teeth shita tongue nodo throat ago jaw kubi neck kata shoulder ude arm hiji elbow te hand yubi finger tsume nail mune chest senaka back onaka stomach hiza knee ashikubi ankle kakato heel tsumasaki toe